Common Questions

Will an oral cancer screening be necessary even if one does not drink or smoke?

People with no known risk factors can still develop oral cancer. Lifestyle, age, and heredity, can play a role in your risk for developing oral cancer, but routine checkups and screenings allow us to catch problems before they escalate.

Are small sores in the mouth a concern?

If you notice any unusual spots, sores, discolorations or bumps in your mouth, you should be checked by your health care provider immediately. As noted before: when oral cancer is detected early, treatment is very successful.

Is oral cancer screening painful?

It is not painful to get checked for oral cancer. During the initial exam, Dr.Klostermyer will simply look inside your mouth, check the gums, lips, and other soft tissue for any potential spots or sores. In case an area looks suspicious, she can perform a brush test, which means gently scraping cells to be sent off to the lab for further assessment.

Why should you to visit a dental office every six months if you don’t have any problems?

Preventive care is less expensive than remediation. Certain problems that often prompt a dental visit like inflamed gums and tooth pain are will not suffice as measures for a preemptive oral cancer screening strategy. During regular visits Dr. Klostermyer will monitor your oral health and catch any issues before they become more significant.

At which age should a child have the first visit at a dental office?

The American Dental Association recommends an initial visit when children turn one and most baby teeth are present. The first visit should be a playful examination so the child makes positive associations for future healthcare visits. The child can get familiar with sitting in the dental chair and examine simple dental tools (with supervision) and slowly be exposed to the fact that taking care of one’s own teeth is a life-long habit that can be fun and rewarding.

Should metal fillings be replaced immediately?

At one time, amalgam was the material of choice for standard fillings. Now, most dentists prefer composite fillings. Composite fillings should be made to match your natural tooth color, have a leak-tight interface with the tooth surface and are metal-free. If the old metal fillings aren’t causing any problems, one can choose to leave them in place, however if a more esthetic restoration is desired, replacing them with composite fillings is an option.